TTT- Top Ten Tuesday Books I’ve had to DNF


Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly Meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish for this weeks Top Ten Tuesday I am going to be discussing books that I just could not finish and had to DNR. I like to finish most books I read but sometimes if I’m not just enjoying a book I’d rather put it down and pick up something I will enjoy than struggle on. As with everything this is just my opinion and everyone enjoys different things. So… lets get cracking!

1.The Innocents by Francesca Segal

the innocents

This is a difficult one because this book was something that I wanted to read for a while, it’s the winner of the Costa First Novel Award 2012 and runs with the tag line – What if everything you ever wanted was no longer enough? That line, the beautiful cover and I was hooked the book is a re-telling of Edith Wharton’s The Age of Innocence and having not read that book any references to the original source material were utterly lost on me. Having said that, if you need to have read The Age of Innocence to enjoy The Innocents this book doesn’t really stand up that well on its own not for me at least.

2.The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman

the ocean at the end of the lane

Before reading this I had wanted to reading something by Neil Gaiman for ages and this is still the only novel of his I have read. While this is a beautifully written book, I just didn’t really get sucked into to the world and kept putting it down and picking up other books. It’s been quite some time now since I began reading The Ocean at the End of the Lane and I just don’t see myself finishing it but I am eager to read more of Neil Gaiman’s work.

3.Dark Lover J.R Ward

dark lover

Just another Vampire novel… Look I know this series is beloved but I found it pretty Meh. There are many books in this series and to get me invested in another series with Vampires it’s going to take something pretty special.


4.How I Live Now by Meg Rosoff

how I live now

I really wanted to like this book, the premise was interesting, the cover was cute and Saoirse Ronan was in the film adaption, check, check and check. It was the writing style that did it for me, I know that every author has a different voice and How I Live Now inpartcular was in the voice of the main character but it was really off putting and resulted in me putting it down (the book that is).

5.The Virgin Suicides by Jefferfy Eugenides


Interesting and creative but I found it a bit slow.

6.Beautiful Creatures by Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohe

beautiful creatures

This is one of those books and we all know the ones that really felt like they were jumping on the Twilight band wagon. I don’t really like it when it feels as if an author as written a book for the audience and genre and mood and fashion of the publishing industry of the time rather than just letting their creativity flow no matter of the fashion of the industry at the time.

7.Broken by A.E Rought


Broken is a re-telling of Frankenstein which sounds great… in theory. I have a bit of a bug bear when classics are retold in a high school setting. It’s not about YA because I read YA I love the genre but when books are re-told in high schools it automatically lessons the original story some how and fills it with teen angst.


8.Hurt by Tabitha Suzuma


This book has a massive twist and it would have been great if I hadn’t guessed it about one hundred pages in.

9 .Anna Dressed in Blood by Kendare Blake

Anna dressed in blood


10.The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater

raven boys

This is not good or bad I just didn’t connect to the plot. so, NEXT!

So that was a miserable Top Ten Tuesday if you have any DNF or series you won’t finish let me know in the down bar.

Happy reading everyone and see you next time :-)


October TBR

October is one of those months which is great for theme reading and I would love to make this a October a wicked one.


Those spooky reads really get me in the mood for the month but I am already committed to quite a few ARCs and challenges, series and things so it won’t be as a spooky heavy month as I would like. So in the spirit in keeping October and Halloween  here is my slightly creepy, a little too long, but hopefully I will get round to most of them, October TBR. :-) But as always I’m sure I will pick up quite a few things that aren’t on the list.

Clockwork Prince and Clockwork Princess by Cassandra Clare

kzvn CP2_cover

For some reason I HAD to re-read Clockwork Angel in September I love this series and now I have started the re-read I have been sucked back into that Shadow Hunter world and want to see it through to the bitter end. But I forgot about the feels guys, all the feels… If you haven’t read The Infernal Devices what are you still doing here go, go now and read! (Maybe finish reading my post first though :-)

All The Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

all the light we cannot see

I have been seeing this book around for so long and now I’m in the perfect mood for a real World War Two historical fiction epic.

Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children By Ransom Riggs

miss peregrine

In the spirit of creepy reads a YA novel based around antique photographs sounds like it fits the bill to me. This is one of those series that I have been meaning to read for a while and with the film on its way and the third book out this October seems to be the perfect time, I just hope it lives up to the hype.

The Woman in Black by Susan Hill

the woman in black

I have see the film adaptation version of this staring Daniel Radcliff a few times and anyone who has seen that film knows it’s creepy. Also though it was really enjoyable and when I found out it was based on a book (and not just a stage play) a bought a copy of the book I think it was last October actually and never got round to reading it so I plan to get to it this October and hopefully I enjoy it as much as I did when watching the film.

Worlds of Ink and Shadow by Lena Coakley

Worlds of Ink and Shadow

I have just received this as an ARC thanks to NetGalley and am really excited to get to it, this book revolves round the Bronte sisters and is described as a novel of romance and intrigue. While one sister Branwell slips into madness the sisters feel their lives slipping away and must weigh the cost of their powerful imaginations. This sounds fantastic! Entering the world of the Bronte sisters, authors of books such as Wuthering Heights and Jane Eyre I’m hoping this is going to be a real treat!

The Chronicles of Narnia – The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe


Really looking forward to reading this as part as my The Problem of Susan Challenge to find out more about the challenge and The Problem of Susan click here or to read my review of The Magicians Nephew book 1 in the Chronicles of Narnia click here.

I’m already half way through Clockwork Prince by Cassandra Clare, hopefully it’s going to be a great reading month. Happy Reading Everyone! x

Real neat blogger Award

The Real Neat Blog Award!

Hi guys I’m a little late posting this but better late than never and all that! I have been nominated by Tanaz over at Bookish Freaks thanks so much for the nomination and everyone should go check out her blog because it’s great!

Thanks again for the nomination, now lets get started!


So, now for the rules…

  1. Put the award logo on your blog
  2. Answer 7 questions set by the person who nominated you and create 7 of your own
  3. Thank the people who nominated you and link to their blog
  4. Nominate as many people as you like and link to their blogs
  5. Let them know you nominated them

Tanaz’s Questions

  1. Do you have a bookish playlist?

No not really for me books and music are pretty separate things.

2. Favourite book to film or book to t.v adaptation?

O1  Outlander Jamie and Claire

At the moment I am loving the t.v adaptation of Outlander it’s full of such drama and has been really faithful to the book. This doesn’t exactly count but I am really excited about the film adaptation of Brooklyn which is coming out this November, can’t wait to see how it plays out page to screen!

brooklyn cover    Brooklyn 2

3.Top ten book covers?

There are so many beautiful book covers out there but the ones that immediately come to mind are all three Shatter me book covers, all the infernal devices covers particularly Clockwork Princess although all Cassandra Clare book covers are beautiful and I love how matchy matchy they all are! The Station Eleven book cover is stunning and I also really like the Stonemouth by Iain Banks hardback cover.

Station Eleven  Stonemouth 7  CP2_cover

4.How long have you been blogging and what has it been like?

I have been blogging for about five years but this blog has only existed for two years. I started off fashion blogging with two other fashion bloggers but to be honest I lost interest as that wasn’t really something I was that passionate about and that blog no longer exists. I moved on to a more general blog where I wrote about all sorts of things and a lot of time that included books and reviewing book and then lead to me forming Paint and Butterflies Books. Since forming this blog I have such a great experience the ‘community’ has been so welcoming and I have read some books that I never would have read if it wasn’t for blogging, bloggers and other blogs.

5 .Do you have any blogger goals?

I just want my blog to develop and grow and hopefully maintain and grow my readership. I also want to learn and make whatever it is I am doing here the best it can be.

6. Favourite blog meme?

Not particularly I don’t really have a fave no.

7. If you had to create a blog meme/tag/feature what would it be?

I think it would have something to do with book villains so maybe a book villains feature I don’t think they get enough mentions :-)

Villian       villian 2     villian 3








My Questions

  1. Favourite Book Hero?
  2. Favourite YA series?
  3. Favourite Book Villain?
  4. Favourite animal character in a book?
  5. Best Book you have read this year?
  6. Who is your ultimate OTP? Name series/Book name and characters
  7. What book series will you never finish?

Brooklyn by Colm Toibin – Review

E book provided by Netgalley in return for a honest review 

brooklyn cover

Over view

Brooklyn is the story of Eillis Lacey a young woman in 1950’s Ireland Eillis  lives with her widowed mother and her much loved older sister Rose. Rose and her mother have high hopes for Eillis and when the only work she can find in her small home town is working behind a small shop counter for a nasty shop keeper Eillis’ mother and sister conspire for her to move to America to live and work. Sponsored by a local priest who now lives in Brooklyn Rose and Mrs Lacey are told about the great job prospects in Brooklyn for a girl like Eillis along with a thriving Irish community. Before she can protest or fight for her right to stay in the country she loves Eillis finds herself on a boat full of strangers with the worst sea sickness of her life sailing towards a life that had been picked out for her and one she never would have chosen for herself.

Brooklyn 1

What did I think of Brooklyn? (Some spoilers)

Brooklyn is a story with many layers but the more I think about it the more I think it is both Rose and Eillis’ story. Rose is described as being the sister who would have loved to travel – who was exciting and beautiful and wild and free. I think she did want Eillis to have a better life but I think she also gave Eillis the life she would have wanted for her self.

Brooklyn 6

If things had have turned out differently I think Eillis should have stayed in Ireland it is so much a part of who she is as a character and so much a part of the story she misses her home, her streets the people. Yes she is home sick, but for her it never really passed and when she get’s a chance to go home that is solidified for me.

Brooklyn 3

I did have some issues with this book predominately the writing style the way it was written made it hard to connect to the characters they seemed far off and distant some how. There are some characters in this novel (Tony Eillis boyfriend and his younger brother Frank) which I know are supposed be cheeky and funny and it’s more a case that I am being told they are funny rather than experiencing it for myself. This book lacks dialogue which I find problematic.

Brooklyn 5

Overall it was a good read, two great love interests all the time being tarnished by Eillis’s desire just to be a Irish girl in Ireland. When I finished it I felt sad, I still feel sad, I would recommended reading.

3/5 stars

Brooklyn is soon to be a motion picture to be released towards the end of this year definitely a must see!


The Emoji Book Tag!

Hi guys,

I have been tagged by the lovely Sara at Freadom Library this Tag consists of my favourite and most used Emoji’s and picking books that correspond with those Emoji’s.

So lets get started…

The Grinning Emoji


I use this when I’m happy or find something funny. I don’t read a lot of happy books I read a lot of books with a serious under tone or a lot of drama going on in the sub plot. A book that made me happy is The Mortal Instruments – The City of Bones by Cassandra Clare. Any time Simon and Jace have any dialogue together pure comedy gold! To check out my original review click here

gfsg      cLARY JACE

The Angry Emoji


Books don’t often make me angry, frustrated maybe or irritated but not angry but one comes to mind, Tyringham Park by Rosemary McLoughlin. It’s a Downton Abbey esk novel with the most annoying main character I have ever read, every decision she makes had me screaming why just why. I hated her in such a passionate way that I nearly put the book down several times. But I did finish it, and this book has stayed with me, for having one of the most frustrating main characters EVER! To read my original review just click

pb1     nope

The Crying Emoji


For this emoji I have chosen a book I have read recently – Me Before You by Jo Jo Moyes.  The touching story of Lou who becomes the carer for a suicidal Will who has recently become paralysed from the neck down. She makes it her mission to show him life is worth living and learns that maybe she has a lot to learn from Will as well. This book is one of my favourite reads this year I found it so touching and even shed a few tears, it is being adapted into a film staring Emilia Clark (Game of Thrones) and I can’t wait. To check out my original review just click.

me before you 1     Crying Rose

I am not amused emoji

im not amused

I don’t like to bash any book but I just really didn’t have a good time reading Anna Dressed in Blood by Kendare Blake. At the time I read it this book it was really popular and I saw so many great reviews on Goodreads and Booktube and I’m not going to deny I was totally on board with the concept but… I just found the whole thing really boring and once I started reading found it all quite predictable DNF. I know this is quite a popular book but we all have different tastes but needless to say I won’t be continuing on with this series.

Anna dressed in blood    puppy

The Kissing Emoji


For the kissing emoji I have picked The Host by Stephanie Meyer I am currently reading this book and I am really enjoying the first love triangle I have ever read that includes only two bodies. I think Stephanie Meyer gets a bad rap because of the twilight novels but I am about half way through this Alien invasion, Dystopian love story and I am loving it! Review coming soon.

the host     ian wanda

So that’s it for this Tag! Thanks again Sara for this Tag now for my nominations-


Magic of Books

The Desert Bibliophile

Sarah’s Bookshelf

Oxford Writer’s Lounge

Thanks for reading x


mood reader

Confessions of a Mood Reader

I’ve been thinking recently how what I read is greatly influenced by my mood, I am always trying to push myself when it comes to my reading but if I don’t feel like reading that genre then I just can’t do it.

mood reader

For example my TBR pile is a mess, with books I have bought, challenges, ARC requests just everything even books that have been sitting there lonely and undiscovered for far to long. So when pondering which book to pick up next I normally open and close a few things (close quite a few) and fling myself over my bed in a helpless manor as if I am never going to be able decided. The choice is to great, the mountain to high I may as well face it I AM NEVER READING AGAIN. Okay so maybe this is slightly over dramatic and I really should do something about my mountainous TBR if it is resulting in behaviour suitable of a teenage drama queen.

teenage drama queen

Normally when in this mood – suitable for a TBR shaming blog post I pause and think what do I want to read, what draws me in. And normally I am in the mood for a very specific genre and when this happens nothing else will do. Classics forget about it, YA no way, I am currently in the mood for Sci-Fi/Romance (not to get to specific) which has resulted me reading The Host by Stephanie Meyer (This is a book I’ve read before!) But the heart wants what it wants, I enjoy watching my TBR decrease and blitzing my way through my Goodreads reading challenge but reading is also for enjoyment so I guess I’m just going to read what makes me happy.

the host

On the up side I’ve never reviewed The Host before so there’s a little something to look forward to, hope that wasn’t to ranty for you and you’re all having a good weekend.

Mel and jared

Chloe x

Short list

Man Booker Shortlist Announced

So today the Man Book Short list was Announced and I know it’s blasphemy but this year I actually haven’t read any of the books on the Longlist. So I am planning on rectifying this and challenging myself to read the Longlist by the end of the year, it’s a relaxed challenge and just for fun but for now here’s Man booker Longlist. Enjoy everyone!

A Brief History of Seven Killings by Marlon James

A brief history

From the acclaimed author of The Book of Night Women comes a masterfully written novel that explores the attempted assassination of Bob Marley in the late 1970s.

On December 3, 1976, just before the Jamaican general election and two days before Bob Marley was to play the Smile Jamaica Concert, gunmen stormed his house, machine guns blazing. The attack nearly killed the Reggae superstar, his wife, and his manager, and injured several others. Marley would go on to perform at the free concert on December 5, but he left the country the next day, not to return for two years.

Deftly spanning decades and continents and peopled with a wide range of characters—assassins, journalists, drug dealers, and even ghosts—A Brief History of Seven Killings is the fictional exploration of that dangerous and unstable time and its bloody aftermath, from the streets and slums of Kingston in the 70s, to the crack wars in 80s New York, to a radically altered Jamaica in the 90s. Brilliantly inventive and stunningly ambitious, this novel is a revealing modern epic that will secure Marlon James’ place among the great literary talents of his generation.

A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara

A little life

Brace yourself for the most astonishing, challenging, upsetting, and profoundly moving book in many a season. An epic about love and friendship in the twenty-first century that goes into some of the darkest places fiction has ever traveled and yet somehow improbably breaks through into the light.

When four classmates from a small Massachusetts college move to New York to make their way, they’re broke, adrift, and buoyed only by their friendship and ambition. There is kind, handsome Willem, an aspiring actor; JB, a quick-witted, sometimes cruel Brooklyn-born painter seeking entry to the art world; Malcolm, a frustrated architect at a prominent firm; and withdrawn, brilliant, enigmatic Jude, who serves as their center of gravity. Over the decades, their relationships deepen and darken, tinged by addiction, success, and pride. Yet their greatest challenge, each comes to realize, is Jude himself, by midlife a terrifyingly talented litigator yet an increasingly broken man, his mind and body scarred by an unspeakable childhood, and haunted by what he fears is a degree of trauma that he’ll not only be unable to overcome—but that will define his life forever.

In rich and resplendent prose, Yanagihara has fashioned a tragic and transcendent hymn to brotherly love, a masterful depiction of heartbreak, and a dark examination of the tyranny of memory and the limits of human endurance

Satin Island by Tom McCarthy


From the author of Remainder (the major feature-film adaption of which will be released in 2015) and C (short-listed for the Booker Prize), and winner of the Windham Campbell Prize, a novel that promises to give us the first and last word on the world–modern, postmodern, whatever world you think you are living in.

When we first meet U., our narrator, he is waiting out a delay in the Turin airport. Clicking through corridors of trivia on his laptop he stumbles on information about the Shroud of Turin–and is struck by the degree to which our access to the truth is always mediated by a set of veils or screens, with any world built on those truths inherently unstable. A “corporate ethnographer,” U. is tasked with writing the “Great Report,” an ell-encompassing document that would sum up our era. Yet at every turn, he feels himself overwhelmed by the ubiquity of data, lost in buffer zones, wandering through crowds of apparitions. Madison, the woman he is seeing, is increasingly elusive, much like the particulars in the case of the recent parachutist’s death with which U. is obsessed. Add to that his longstanding obsession with South Pacific cargo cults and his developing, inexplicable interest in oil spills. As he begins to wonder if the Great Report might remain a shapeless, oozing plasma, his senses are startled awake by a dream of an apocalyptic cityscape. In Satin Island, Tom McCarthy captures–as only he can– the way we experience our world, our efforts to find meaning (or just to stay awake) and discern the narratives we think of as our lives.

A Spool of Blue thread by Anne Tyler

Spool of Blue Thread

From the beloved Pulitzer Prize-winning author–now in the fiftieth year of her remarkable career–a brilliantly observed, joyful and wrenching, funny and true new novel that reveals, as only she can, the very nature of a family’s life.
“It was a beautiful, breezy, yellow-and-green afternoon.” This is the way Abby Whitshank always begins the story of how she fell in love with Red that day in July 1959. The whole family–their two daughters and two sons, their grandchildren, even their faithful old dog–is on the porch, listening contentedly as Abby tells the tale they have heard so many times before. And yet this gathering is different too: Abby and Red are growing older, and decisions must be made about how best to look after them, and the fate of the house so lovingly built by Red’s father. Brimming with the luminous insight, humor, and compassion that are Anne Tyler’s hallmarks, this capacious novel takes us across three generations of the Whitshanks, their shared stories and long-held secrets, all the unguarded and richly lived moments that combine to define who and what they are as a family.

The Fishermen by Chigozie Obioma

The Fisherman

In a Nigerian town in the mid 1990’s, four brothers encounter a madman whose mystic prophecy of violence threatens the core of their close-knit family. Told from the point of view of nine year old Benjamin, the youngest of four brothers, The Fisherman is the story of an unforgettable childhood in 1990s Nigeria, in the small town of Akure. When their strict father has to travel to a distant city for work, the brothers take advantage of his extended absence to skip school and go fishing. At the ominous, forbidden nearby river, they meet a dangerous local madman who persuades the oldest of the boys that he is destined to be killed by one of his siblings. What happens next is an almost mythic event whose impact-both tragic and redemptive-will transcend the lives and imaginations of its characters and its readers. Dazzling and viscerally powerful, The Fishermen never leaves Akure but the story it tells has enormous universal appeal. Seen through the prism of one family’s destiny, this is an essential novel about Africa with all of its contradictions—economic, political, and religious—and the epic beauty of its own culture. With this bold debut, Chigozie Obioma emerges as one of the most original new voices of modern African literature, echoing its older generation’s masterful storytelling with a contemporary fearlessness and purpose.

Excited to get to these congratulations to all those nominated and to a great Shortlist Manbooker. If you have any recommendations of which book from Shortlist or Longlist I should start with or have a favourite you would love to chat about do get in touch.